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to depart the special mission without ambassador stephen came after repeated efforts of many security agents to find him in a smoke-filled the building still on fire. it was precipitated by second armed attack on the compound from the south. on the night of the attacks, tripoli and washington communicated in coordinated effectively with each other. the loop in the military right away and in your agency response was timely and appropriate, but there was simply not enough time ford military forces to have made a difference. having said that, it is not reasonable nor feasible to tether u.s. forces at the ready to respond to protect every high risk proposed in the world. we found there was no immediate tactical warning of the september 11 attacks, but there was the knowledge gap and the intelligence community understanding of extremist militia and libya and the potential threat they pose. although some threats were known. in this context, increased violence and targeting of foreign diplomats have failed to come in to clear relief against the backdrop of an effect of local governments, widespread
that is needed. ambassador stephens was a proud californian. -- stevens was a proud californian. i will get to my question. i guess i will ask it straight out -- do you plan in the next budget to request funding levels that are necessary for protecting all of our facilities? >> the answer to that is yes, senator. i am aware that we are under constraints. i remind the committee that for everything we do at the state department, that includes protecting overt 275 locations around the world, the assistance we provide including to israel, everything we do at the state department is less than 1% of our federal budget. >> my question is, are you going to submit to us the plan and the money request do believe you need and paying attention to fiscal constraints? will that be what you truly believe? because i hope so. you cannot count on us to know what the needs are. >> there is no question. we have been ordered to come to congress and the med the 2013 budget requests -- and amend the 2013 budget requests. to add money for our construction costs and to increase diplomatic security for about 5%. we are in
the america's financial future. here is stephen ohlemacher. thank you for being here. how many people in america receive social security? >> a little bit more than 56 million people get social security. the average benefit is a little over $1,200 a month. so maybe it is like $13,000, $14,000 a year. >> we're talking about retirees but also the disabled. >> yes, fairly wide group of people get social security benefits, retired workers, spouses, children, disabled workers, widows, widowers. it is a fairly big social safety net of people who get social security benefits. >> as you mentioned about 56 million the retirees received a $1,2 a month. there is also the s.s.i. about $500 a month. how does social security get financed? >> it has been a self funded program. it is funded by payroll taxes. there's a 12.4% tax on wages up to about $110,000. you make more than that then any money you make over that is not taxed for social security. it is divided equally between your employer and the worker. for the past two years, the workers share has been reduced. that has saved, by the way, if you
schwarzkop died at the age of 78. supreme court justice stephen briar talks about the united states constitution and the history of the rule of law. this interview was part of a discussion on china opposed the legal system hosted by the brookings institution. china's >> ok. concepts. for 20 years i have been advising -- roughly half of that on financial economic matters. the other half a variety of topics. about 10 years ago, we started talking about role of law. i said to him at the time, what strikes me about this topic was that other than the occasion i can think of, other than when paul worked at the state department and bill clinton was president, this topic in my view has never gotten the attention it deserves. it has been treated too much as a technical topic. not as a fundamental topic about the relations of the states. in my experience, i always say the chinese leadership, the most distinctive characteristic is they are systematically opened. that is to say the modus operandi is on a particular topic, let's look for the best ideas throughout the world, bring them back, stud
it is involved in the discussions, the negotiations over america's financial future, is stephen ohlemacher, joining us from the associated press, where he is a reporter. how much social security do people get? guest: a little more than 66 million people. the average benefit is a little over $12,000 -- a little over $1,200 a month. maybe $13,000 a year or so. host: we are talking about retirees and the disabled. guest: a fairly wide group of people receive social security benefits. retired workers, spouses, children, disabled workers, widows, widowers. a big safety net of people. host: retirees receive about $1,200 a month on average. the benefits for the disabled, $1,100 a month on average. how does social security get financed? guest: it has been a self-funded program since its inception. it is funded by payroll taxes. there's a 12.4% tax on wages up to about $110,000. if you make more than that, any money you make over that is not taxed as part of social security. the tax is divided equally between your employer and the worker. for the past two years, the workers' share of 6.2% has been
larson on the fiscal cliff negotiations. after that, we will hear from stephen ohlemacher. you can see "washington journal" everyday life at 7 p.m. -- 7 a.m. eastern here on c-span. coming up next on c-span, the in going an upcoming german discusses what they want to see and a and budget deal. then david walker and rudy penner discuss the fiscal cliff negotiations. later, a discussion on the potential impacts of the negotiations and state budgets. >> the white house was very controversial, as most americans were. they designed washington city. there was competition. he designed a design for a palace. it was not particularly awe- inspiring. in fact, a european diplomat told congress it was neither large or awe-inspiring. but the answer the congressman gave was the building serves its purpose. it is larger and more elegant. photo mer new york times bodh critic on the white house. watch it on sunday on c-span three on "american history tv per." >> congressman steve scalise and jim jordan. >> thank you for coming. to delighted to welcome you a presentation by the outgoing and incoming chai
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6